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Nidaros

Question From Norway.

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Norwegians don't have a drinking culture around football matches. It's even illegal to sell beer at the stadium during matches. We go to the stadium, see the match and go home again. And in Trondheim even winning the league is barely celebrated for more than 20-30 minutes at the stadium.. Maybe a couple of hundreds go out to party. The rest goes home.

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Come on. Surely you realise how easy it is to flip that right back at you? About as reasonable as me having a dig through some Old Firm forum and basing my impression of Scottish people off that.

 

 

 Your are correct of course, but the fact that is an internet forum surely excuses me :wink: . I was not there tonight but funnily enough will be in Bergen on Sunday, Olden on Monday, Andalness on Tuesday and Stavanger on Thursday. I will be wearing a saints top at all times on Norwegian soil.. And I hear the good news is that it is gonna be warmer next week ..

 

All the best Hank..( apart from next Thursday obviously) :cool:

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Norwegians don't have a drinking culture around football matches. It's even illegal to sell beer at the stadium during matches. We go to the stadium, see the match and go home again. And in Trondheim even winning the league is barely celebrated for more than 20-30 minutes at the stadium.. Maybe a couple of hundreds go out to party. The rest goes home.

Sounds a bit bland and boring mate!

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What Kjello said is only partly true. Norwegians in general don't but it's certainly not like that with everyone. When we won the league in 2010, there was a fairly big group who remained in the stands singing constantly for another hour. We are just so used to winning that we don't have the huge celebrations. Hopefully the 2-year draught can be stopped this year and we will see some crazy scenes. 

 

There is a pub behind our stand where we can purchase beer uptil 30 minutes before kick off. But yeah, your everyday Norwgian who goes to football can definetely be seen as incredibly boring. 

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Sounds a bit bland and boring mate!

 

Well, that's our style. The people of Trøndelag is known for being very calm in their personality. We celebrate for our self. And don't feel the big need to express our feelings verbally of visually.

It has to be something really extra ordinary to get the people of Trøndelag celebrating. Even when we eliminated AC Milan on San Siro and advanced to the quarter finals in CL 96-97 there was barely a couple hundred welcoming the team at the airport.

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Sounds a bit bland and boring mate!

It's their culture Lark, I don't see any real problem with it.  Also, while football is easily the biggest sport over here, I would doubt that is the case in Norway.  Having visited Norway in the past, I would have to say it's a beautiful country and the people are very friendly.

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Norwegians don't have a drinking culture around football matches. It's even illegal to sell beer at the stadium during matches. We go to the stadium, see the match and go home again. And in Trondheim even winning the league is barely celebrated for more than 20-30 minutes at the stadium.. Maybe a couple of hundreds go out to party. The rest goes home.

 

========================

 

Keep in mind that in Norway they also support ice Hockey teams, skiing - in many disciplines, bandy, innebandy and also sailing are fairly big sports.................

..............................in Scotland we are basically alcoholic hooligans....who interrupt the football to support the Rugby! Let's face it!!!!!!

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Football is the biggest sport in terms of people playing it. But unlike in Scotland, football got big competition from other sports when it comes to interest and hence also sponsor and media money. Mainly winter sports. But It's still the biggest. Also, Norwegian football fans tends to be very anglophile. And about 80 000 Norwegians travel to England every year to watch matches. This has to do with our history. The state TV-channel NRK, which was the only TV-channel until 1987, started sending English league matches every Saturday in 1969 and that didn't stop until 1999. Norwegian league matches wasn't sent live on TV until the late 80's. Also, in the 90's there was a lot of Norwegians playing in the Premier League. While the Norwegian league was kind of boring with Rosenborg winning it 13 years in a row from 1992 to 2004. So it wasn't to hard for a young Norwegian to become more interested in English football than Norwegian football. The English supporter clubs of Norway has over 100 000 members. While Norwegian supporter clubs barely has 25 000 members.

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Found Norwegians to be friendly people, the majority more interested in their "Scottish visitors" than the game or Rosenborg itself.

Their was a slight arrogance from alot of people before the game, assuming tie was over before it started and showing nointerest in going.

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Football is the biggest sport in terms of people playing it. But unlike in Scotland, football got big competition from other sports when it comes to interest and hence also sponsor and media money. Mainly winter sports. But It's still the biggest. Also, Norwegian football fans tends to be very anglophile. And about 80 000 Norwegians travel to England every year to watch matches. This has to do with our history. The state TV-channel NRK, which was the only TV-channel until 1987, started sending English league matches every Saturday in 1969 and that didn't stop until 1999. Norwegian league matches wasn't sent live on TV until the late 80's. Also, in the 90's there was a lot of Norwegians playing in the Premier League. While the Norwegian league was kind of boring with Rosenborg winning it 13 years in a row from 1992 to 2004. So it wasn't to hard for a young Norwegian to become more interested in English football than Norwegian football. The English supporter clubs of Norway has over 100 000 members. While Norwegian supporter clubs barely has 25 000 members.

Learned a lot from that article Kjello, cheers.

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I wonder when you guys have been so dominant domestically, the European games aren't more important to you? Is it the Europa league that isn't important compared to the champions league?

The Europa League is considered a B-cup through most of Europe. And after playing in the Champions League 11 times in 13 years playing in the B-cup isn't considered interesting enough. We used to meet Real Madrid, Bayern Munich, Juventus, Arsenal, Borussia Dortmund, Inter Milan and so on every year. Meeting Rapid Vienna, Metalist Kharkiv or Bayer Leverkusen doesn't then create the massive interest anymore.

But as I've said. The Europa League has problems through whole Europe. The decisive round of 16 match between Inter Milan and Tottenham in February barely drew 18 000 people to the stands. That would have been 70 000+ if the competition was Champions League.

Champions League matches was always sold out on Lerkendal. And the qualifying matches usually drew 10 000+ to the stands. Back in 2007 there was 14 123 spectators against Finish team Tampere United even after winning 3-0 in the first leg in Finland.

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Yes but the winner of the UEFA Europa League qualifies for the UEFA Super Cup and will qualify for the UEFA Champions

League should they win that. Is that not incentive enough if you are not the force you were 'once upon a time?'

There are a number of big clubs in England who reflect on past glories and think they should be somewhere higher in the

pyramid.

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It's an understandable point. I guess in Scotland, for as long as the Champions League has been in existence, it has almost exclusively been the Rangers and Celtic competition, and as a result the Europa league takes on a greater value to everyone else.

I do though note that Rangers and Celtic are both very well supported in the Europa league, but perhaps that is mainly in the later stages having failed to make the CL last 16.

I can understand why Rosenborg aren't overly fussed by the 2nd qualifying round against a team they've never heard of from Scotland.

I feel slightly offended by some of the remarks by initially friendly Norwegians on here. It is a typical arrogance that we see from rangers and Celtic. Defeat is always because they played badly and the opposition played ugly, never because the other team played well.

If you think Saints played negative football last night and tried to spoil the flow of the game, you should watch the Scottish national team, or teams like St Mirren and Aberdeen. I believe the stats showed 10 attempts for Saints and 11 for Rosenborg last night, which certainly doesn't seem negative for a team from a country that employed the 4-6-0 formation in an international game!

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against boavista from portugal i champions league the stadium was sold out.  aigainst Athletico Madrid is was about..ehm.. 10-12 000.

 

People are weird. (But i Champions League people had to buy tickets to all the 3 games)

 

Early stage and in a fact, everyone are expecting thats a easy win i'm afraid.  If we'd met you in the last round, more people would have been there.

 

Apart from Legia Warsaw, FC Copenhagen and AIK Stockholm you brought the biggest away crowd ever seen at Lerkendal for a qualify. Thumbs up for that.

 

hope you enjoyed our local beer. And for that guy wanting to change shirts with me at the piano bar after the game, i'm sorry i declined, (my shirt aren't possible to get anymore so sorry for that)

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The Europa League is considered a B-cup through most of Europe. And after playing in the Champions League 11 times in 13 years playing in the B-cup isn't considered interesting enough. We used to meet Real Madrid, Bayern Munich, Juventus, Arsenal, Borussia Dortmund, Inter Milan and so on every year. Meeting Rapid Vienna, Metalist Kharkiv or Bayer Leverkusen doesn't then create the massive interest anymore.

But as I've said. The Europa League has problems through whole Europe. The decisive round of 16 match between Inter Milan and Tottenham in February barely drew 18 000 people to the stands. That would have been 70 000+ if the competition was Champions League.

Champions League matches was always sold out on Lerkendal. And the qualifying matches usually drew 10 000+ to the stands. Back in 2007 there was 14 123 spectators against Finish team Tampere United even after winning 3-0 in the first leg in Finlal

 

 

it's all very well degrading a competition after you've been beat and in truth The champions League is the big one however playing in Europe for a club of our stature is a rarity and whatever you say it's still very  special you're playing against the top teams in other euro leagues , your seeing how beatiful the game is in parts of Scandanavia and in the borders of asia in turkey how being able to acheive that in only 4 occasions in over a 100 years I hope you can see how much it meant to our little provisional team....

 

 

PS LOOK AT OUR ATTENDANCE THIS COMING THURSDAY THEN YOU"LL KNOW HOW BIG IT IS....

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